Articles Tagged with uninsured motorist

In Alabama, the measure of damages for personal property is the difference between the reasonable market value of the property immediately before it was damaged and its reasonable market value immediately after it was damaged.  In cases where an automobile is damaged but is not a total loss, the cost of repair is considered when determining the difference in market value.  In addition to the cost of repair, any diminution or decrease in value of the automobile resulting from the damage will be considered. When the damage to the vehicle is merely cosmetic or the vehicle is older, there may not be any diminution in value after appropriate repairs are completed.  In cases of newer model cars with substantial damage, the claim for diminution in value can be significant.

Alabama courts have ruled that an owner of property is qualified to state his or her opinion as to value of property before and after injury. Chambers v. Burgess, 281 So.2d 643 (1972); Parker v. Muse, 250 So.2d 688 (1971).  However, in many cases, it is beneficial to use experts to assess the diminution in value to a vehicle.   Experts can be particularly helpful when assessing the impact of damages to antique, classic or exotic automobiles.    Other states utilize a statutory formula using a base loss value, damage modifiers (severe, moderate or minor) and the vehicle’s mileage to assess the diminution in value.

Alabama does not have any laws that designate the type of replacement parts that must be used when repairing a damaged vehicle.  As long as the replacement parts are similar in fit and quality as the damaged parts, used parts or aftermarket parts may be used to complete repairs. Continue reading

CodeThe state can suspend a driver’s license or an owner’s vehicle registration until the proper forms are submitted and fees paid when an uninsured vehicle is involved in a collision or when a driver is pulled over and fails to provide proof of insurance.  The Code of Alabama has two different chapters governing mandatory car insurance and the penalties for not having coverage. They are Ala. Code §32-7-1 et seq. Motor Vehicle Safety-Responsibility Act and Ala. Code §32-7A-l et seq. Mandatory Automobile Liability Insurance.

§32-7-5 of the Motor Vehicle Safety-Responsibility Act requires that any driver involved in a wreck in Alabama, where any person is injured or killed or where more than $250.00 in property damage is sustained, must file a written report with the Department of Public Safety within 30 days of the date of the wreck stating, among other things, that the driver has the required minimum insurance coverage. This is the SR-13 form given to drivers after collisions. The drivers must submit the form whether or not the wreck is their fault.

Under §32-7-6, if one or more of the drivers in a motor vehicle wreck is reported as being uninsured, that driver has 20 days after the submission of an accident report to provide proof that the driver either (1) actually has insurance, (2) has been released from liability, (3) has been finally adjudicated as being not liable, or (4) has agreed to pay installments for any injuries or damages for which the driver is liable. If 60 days passes from the submission of an accident report and an uninsured driver has not provided any of the above information, the Department of Transportation has the power to suspend both the license of the driver and the vehicle registration of any vehicle owned by the uninsured vehicle’s owner.

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